FAQ

 

WHAT IF I'M INDUCED OR HAVE A C-SECTION?

Encapsulation is still possible if you deliver early, are induced, have an epidural, narcotics, pitocin, have multiples or if you have a cesarean section.

 

WHAT IF THE HOSPITAL WANTS TO SEND MY PLACENTA TO PATHOLOGY FOR EXAMINATION BEFORE RELEASING IT?

It's not common but it is possible. Often times chemicals are used that will spoil the placenta. Ask for a piece of the placenta to be used rather than the whole thing, do a visual examination bedside, or ask for them to do a blood test instead of sending it to pathology.  If the entire placenta goes to pathology, ask if it can be kept refrigerated and no chemicals such as formaldehyde be used.  If these chemicals are used, we will be unable to encapsulate it.

 

WHAT IF MY PLACENTA HAS MECONIUM STAINING?

Generally, even if there is meconium present in the womb prior to the placenta being born, it has very little impact on the placenta itself. Meconium is a sterile substance, so it is not the same as fecal matter that occurs after birth, with the introduction of actual food/breast milk. In most situations, the meconium may be present on the membranes, but not on the placental tissue. Therefore, it can easily be removed with the removal of the membranes. It can also be washed off. So meconium staining is not typically a concern to us when encapsulating via the PBi method. The meconium is often removed when the membranes are removed, is washed off during the preparation phase, and any remaining bacteria present will be eliminated during the steaming process. When to be Concerned However, sometimes this "staining" is severe. The meconium will actually be present within the placental tissue itself. The placenta can appear discolored (greenish), and will have an unpleasant odor. In these situations, we need to take an extra step in order to disinfect the placenta before the mother can ingest it.

 

I WILL BE RECEIVING ANTIBIOTICS DURING LABOR. WILL THAT AFFECT THE PLACENTA?

The amount of antibiotics that cross the placenta is unknown; although, many mothers encapsulate their placentas following antibiotics during labor without a problem.

 

HOW DO I CARE FOR MY PLACENTA ONCE IT'S BORN?

In order to keep your placenta in optimal condition for making remedies, you'll want to put it on ice ASAP and then into the refrigerator or freezer depending on when we will be making our first visit. If you are planning a hospital birth, it is a good idea to bring a small cooler that you can fill with ice from the hospital. It is best to put the placenta in a food-grade container (glass or ceramic is best, Ziploc bags are good as well). If you did not bring any of these to the hospital you can put the placenta in whatever container they have--sometimes it's a plastic Tupperware type, sometimes a bio-hazard bag-- into the cooler on ice. If you are birthing at home, just put your placenta in a food-grade container or freezer Ziploc bag and into the refrigerator or freezer within 4 hours after birth. Some families will do a modified lotus-birth and leave the umbilical cord uncut for 3-4 hours. Ideally, we would like to get started on the placenta within a couple of days after the birth. Keeping it refrigerated for a few days is fine, but if it looks like it's going to be 3 or more days, then it's best to freeze it as soon as possible after the birth-- within 24 hours is best. The hospital is often able to store it in the freezer upon request. In the event that your placenta is sent to the pathology lab in the hospital, request that it is kept frozen.

 

WHEN IS MY PLACENTA NOT SUITABLE FORE CONSUMPTION?

For our safety, we cannot work with your placenta if it contains any transmittable diseases such as Hepatitis-B, -C or HIV/AIDS. If for any reason you were to end up with a uterine infection before or during labor, the placenta would be unsuitable for consumption.

 

WHAT IF I TEST POSITIVE FOR GROUP-B STREP?

Generally, testing positive for Group B Strep is not contraindicated with placenta encapsulation, as prepared via the PBi method of encapsulation. If GBS is present in the vagina at the time of birth, any bacteria present on the placenta will be killed during the steaming process, as it is heated above 86 degrees F, the temperature at which the bacteria can survive.   IF the mother develops a uterine infection (chorioamnionitis) as a result of the GBS, her care provider will be aware of the condition and should not release the placenta to her for ingestion purposes. A serious GBS infection present within the placental tissue and membranes would be contraindicated with ingestion. This is a special circumstance.

 

WHY MUST MY PLACENTA BE PREPARED IN MY HOME?

To comply with state and federal guidelines, and create the cleanest and safest environment for encapsulation, the entire process is completed in your home. To reduce the risk of cross-contamination, I bring all necessary supplies and follow strict Federal (OSHA) and local guidelines. As a certified Food Safety Manager, I follow the same procedures for cleanliness and sanitation used in food service establishments. Furthermore, I am trained to handle blood-borne pathogens and medical waste. Apart from the legalities of things, encapsulating a placenta in your home allows the whole family to be as much a part of the process as they would like.  As it has been for centuries, this ritual is a sacred event and photos and questions are welcomed!   I prepare placenta pills in your home for the following reasons:

  • You can be certain that you are getting your own placenta; and ONLY your placenta.

  • You know exactly what happens to your placenta and that it’s been stored at the proper temperature

  • If you choose, you and your family can actively observe the preparation of your placenta capsules

  • You can be assured that your placenta is prepared in a clean environment. Without regular health inspections and monitoring, the only way to ensure your capsules are being prepared in a clean environment is by having them prepared in your home.